January 27, 2021

Scientists discover variation Covit-19 cases reached 22 million

The United States surpassed 22 million corona virus cases on Friday, setting a new record in a single day, according to NBC News.

Records have come in that cases and deaths in the UK have reached new heights since the devastating strain of Govt-19 was discovered there. At least 50 cases of 50 infectious variants have been identified so far in the United States

The United States on Friday reported 269,420 new cases related to Govt-19. Both states set new daily highs: Maine with 41 deaths and New York with 18,687 cases.

More than 369,000 people have died in the United States

As cases and deaths increase, U.S. scientists are turning the clock around to see how widespread the UK variant is. Since the discovery of this strain late last year, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has promised to increase genetic sequencing in the United States, which is needed to detect new strains.

A spokesman for the CDC said the company has been working with state health officials and education and public health laboratories to double the number of samples sorted each week.

In the UK, strain pushes hospitals to their breakdown points.

“Our hospitals have been under more pressure from Govit-19 than ever since the outbreak,” said British Prime Minister Boris Johnson.

Paramedic Ben Shisha said the situation had become “completely insane” and that the number of people confirmed or suspected of having Covit-19 had “exploded exponentially” compared to a week or two ago.

Chicha has been at the forefront of the epidemic since March, and said he has seen patients waiting for hours in ambulances until there is enough space for a hospital.

“This is an example of what’s happening at the moment. It’s everywhere – London, Kent, Essex,” Shisha said, referring to districts in the south-east of England, which have been the hardest hit. “It’s become like a war zone again.”

The virus has killed more than 76,000 people in the UK, the worst death toll in Europe and the fifth worst in the world, according to Johns Hopkins University.